Basado en el libro "los misterios de los números" de Marcus du Sautoy

 

¿Cuántas posibilidades hay de elegir 6 números ordenados de menos a mas y menores de 49 de manera que no haya dos consecutivos?

 

Why Numbers Like to Clump

Here’s how to calculate how many lottery tickets have two consecutive numbers. Mathematicians often use a clever trick of looking at a problem the other way around, and that’s what you can do here. First, you count the tickets with no consecutive numbers, then subtract the result from the total number of possible combinations to find how many combinations have consecutive numbers.
First, pick any six numbers from the numbers 1 to 44 (you’ll see in a moment why you’re only allowed numbers up to 44, not 49). Call your choice of numbers A(1), . . . , A(6), with A(1) the smallest and A(6) the largest. Now, A(1) and A(2) could be consecutive, but A(1) and A(2) + 1 won’t be. A(2) and A(3) could be consecutive, but A(2) + 1 and A(3) + 2 won’t be. So if you take the six numbers A(1), A(2) + 1, A(3) + 2, A(4) + 3, A(5) + 4, and A(6) + 5, none of them will be consecutive. (The restriction of choosing numbers up to 44 becomes clear now, because if A(6) is 44, then A(6) + 5 is 49.)
By using this trick, you can generate all the tickets with no consecutive numbers simply by picking six numbers from 1 to 44 and spreading them out by adding a little to each one. And we find that the number of tickets with no consecutive numbers is the same as the number of combinations of six numbers from 1 to 44. There are \binom{44}{6} such choices.

Este razonamiento, válido, nos lleva a que contar las apuestas sin números consecutivos equivale a las posibilidades que hay de seis saltos de longitud minimo 2, y partiendo de -1 y sumándole esos 6 saltos da menos o igual que 49:

-1+\sum _{1}^{6}x_i\leq 49 con x_i \geq 2

Lo que equivale a

\sum _{1}^{6}x_i\leq 50 con x_i \geq 2

es decir, los puntos en N^6 cuyas coordenadas suman menos o igual que 50 y son todas mayores o iguales que 2

Es fácil generalizar este resultado y concluir que en N^n hay \binom{s-n\cdot d}{n} puntos cuyas coordenadas suman menos o igual que s y son todas mayores que d

Por ejemplo

Los puntos en N^{10} que cumplen \sum _{1}^{10}x_i\leq 50 con x_i > 4 son en total \binom{50-10\cdot 4}{10}

¿Cuántas apuestas de lotería hay cuyos números den saltos mayores que 4 unidades entre número y número?

-4+\sum _{1}^{6}x_i\leq 49 es decir, \sum _{1}^{6}x_i\leq 49 + 4=\binom{49+4-6\cdot 4}{6}=\binom{49-5\cdot 4}{6}

¿Cuántas apuestas de lotería hay cuyos números den saltos mayores que 7 unidades entre número y número?

\binom{49-5\cdot 7}{6}

¿Cuántas apuestas de lotería hay cuyos números den saltos mayores que 9 unidades entre número y número?

\binom{49-5\cdot 9}{6}= NINGUNA

CÁLCULOS

Probabilidad de que no haya números consecutivos = 0.5048015505924849...

Probabilidad de que los números vayan separados más de 2 unidades entre sí = 0.233314211228...

Probabilidad de que los números vayan separados más de 3 unidades entre sí = 0.09617575059626...

Probabilidad de que los números vayan separados más de 4 unidades entre sí = 0.033969268474356355947...

Probabilidad de que los números vayan separados más de 5 unidades entre sí = 0.0096251266464032421479...

Probabilidad de que los números vayan separados más de 6 unidades entre sí = 0.001940242920816463832...

Probabilidad de que los números vayan separados más de 7 unidades entre sí = 0.000214748248975816...

Probabilidad de que los números vayan separados más de 8 unidades entre sí = 0.00000600694402729555...

Probabilidad de que los números vayan separados más de 9 unidades entre sí = 0

 

 

 

 

 


Consolación Ruiz Gil Julio 2016